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. great discussion. >>> the billionaire founder of amazon buys "the washington post." how did bezos change the news business? that debate's next. ezos change the news business? that's coming up next. "the wash post. how did bezos change the news business? that's coming up next. " how did bezos change the news business? that's coming up next. my dna...s me. it helps make me who i am every piece is important... it's like a self-portrait this part.. makes my eyes blue... so that's why the sun makes me sneeze... i might have an increased risk of heart disease... arthritis gallstones hemochromatosis i'll look into that stuff we might pass onto to our kids... foods i might want to avoid... hundreds of things about my health... getting my 23andme results it really opened my eyes... the more you know about your dna the more you know about yourself... i do things a little differently now... eat better... ask more questions change what you can, manage what you can't i always wondered what my dna said about me... me... me. now i know. know more about your health. go to 23andme.com and order your dna
on washington with those who lived it. >>> yesterday tens of thousands of americans converged on the nation's capital to commemorate the 50 th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. it was a historic event that spurred the enactment of the civil rights and voting rights act and one that is now remembered as one of the moral high points of american history. but that is not what political leaders, major media outlets and millions of everyday americans were expecting right up until that march began in 1963. they were bracing for violence and chaos. they were fearing strident and inflammatory rhetoric and they were convinced the main effect of the rally would be to inflict a grievous wound, maybe even a fatal wound, on a very movement it sought to advance. that is the context in which the march took place 50 years ago this week. context that can and all too often is lost to history. it came at a particularly crucial and politically sensitive time in the civil rights movement. three months before the march, in may of 1963, demonstrations in birmingham -- excuse me, demonstrators in birming
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
. seven blacks and six whites left washington, d.c. on two buses they headed south. at first, only minor hostility greeted them. but when one bus arrived in birmingham alabama, a mob surrounded them and beat the freedom fighters. >> i was on the greyhound, that was the bus they set on fire. burned it. and we would have all burned to death had it not been for the fact that one of the fuel tanks of the bus exploded, scared the hell out of the mob. >> reporter: that ride ended abruptly and the riders feared the violence would snuff out the movement. the first ride was not the last. students willing to face death picked up the cause boarding buses heading south. in his san francisco home, frank nelson shares his story with blankenhide. nelson took his first ride in june, by then the movement had spread to trains. >> they got off the train and headed to the homes that were right there. the black riders went into the whites homes and they were carted off to jail. >> reporter: nelson was 23 when his body was bruised and beaten. >> friend, i'm a mississippi segragist and i'm proud of it. >> repo
is. the sale of "the washington post" is a tricky matter for the si single reason it is an original source of knowing what you and i should know about. and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "all in with chris hayes" starts right now. >>> good evening from new york. i am in for are the great chris hayes. tonight on "all in" the sale of "the washington post" yesterday to billionaire jeff besos. i have thoughts and even feelings about all this since i actually work there. that is coming up. also tonight president obama makes a return to phoenix to talk about the great american dream of owning your own home. i submit homeownership isn't for everybody. it shouldn't be tax deductible. but first, did anything really interesting happen where you worked yesterday? >> the "the post" has been sold to jeff besos. >> every graham, not the only everybody but at the top of "the washington post" company had the same reaction when they started to think about the possibility which was great surprise. it was good for "the post. "we knew we could keep "the post" alive. our aspiration
'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. reince priebus is on the warpath again. the rnc chairman who has made bones trying to suppress african-american votes now has a plan to suppress the free media. having waged war on the 15th amendment, the one that gave african-americans the right to vote, he is now batting down the hatches on a free press. priebus's plan, which he described last night is to take control of the republican nominating process, deciding who will be the moderators of the debates, which debates will be authorized and which networks will be allowed to sponsor them. he, reince priebus will henceforth decide who gets to moderate the debates, where they will be permitted and which networks will be given the privilege of sponsoring them. he reince priebus will decide this big push for personal control is consistent with his oversight of a major republican plan to make it harder for minorities, the elderly and young voters to cast ballots. having loaded people down with more document requirements, voter photo i.d. cards and the rest and few opportunit
"politicsnation" starts right now with reverend al sharpton live from washington, d.c. rev, that had to be one heck of a day in american history to be a part of that. >> no, i was very honored to be part of it. it was an exciting day, a great day. we're going to talk about it on "politicsnation," ed. and you did a great job saturday at the march. we really enjoyed you. you have a little preacher in you. >> i do. i haven't unleashed it all yet, rev. >> all right. all right. >> "politicsnation" starts right now here on msnbc. rev, take it away. >> all right. thank you, ed. thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, the dream lives on 50 years after dr. martin luther king jr. inspired the nation. america's first african-american president reminded us -- reminded all of us that today's economic inequities mean there's still much more work to do. i was there for the day's commemoration as some 100,000 people gathered to hear more than 200 speakers. everyone from former presidents, carter and clinton, to activists and civil rights leaders. at points there was a spontaneous song
commercial presentation is made possible by bank of america. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sublime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and exuding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about 2:40 in the afternoon, the last speaker rose to the
were also in washington today to mark this anniversary. >> when i look out over this diverse crowd and survey the guests on this platform, i seemed to realize what otis redding is talking about, and what dr. king preached about, this moment has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> now, it is time for "the last word" with lawrence o'donnell, thank you for joining us, have a great night. >>> 50 years ago tonight, reporters filing stories on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and y thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at th
on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at the wall of segregation and saw that the power of love could bring it down. >> martin luther king jr. did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political grid lock. >> the arc may have bent towards justice, but it doesn't bend on its own. >> for all who are willing to take the flame for justice, i know that flame remains. the tired teacher, the businessman, they are marching. >> we knew fear. the sound of the bells today. let freedom ring everywhere we g
. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. ♪ >> people of all races, regular people from all walks of life, marching against injustice, marching to change history. >> we are the moral revolution. >> how long? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to ask and a call for peace. a word that inspired a people, a nation and the entire world. >> free at least, free at least. thank god almighty we are free at least. >> tonight a special hour-hour toll particulars nation. the march on washington. the dream continues. >>> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. first years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am right now watching history. millions more watching at home, seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement. call for justice and equality. i talked to him from the exact spot where he can spoke 50 years ago. and we'll hear some of the young people who traveled hundreds of miles to help change the course of history. i'm honored to begin the show tonight with martin luther king iii and reverend joseph lowry, who mean cal
memorial in washington, d.c., where we all try to advance the dream. >>> good evening from new york. i'm chris hayes. tonight on "all in," as the struggle for low-wage employees continues, fast food worker strikes demanding higher wages spread across the country. my guess tonight is the former ceo of mcdonald's, who says raising the minimum wage will kill jobs. i disagree, and that's coming up. >>> also tonight, this weekend we commemorate the 50th anniversary on the civil rights march on washington. tonight, a look at a half century of racial progress. how far we have come and how far we have yet to go. >>> but we begin tonight with president obama, who just a few hours ago completed the last of four speeches in two days about something that is increasing the source of high anxiety for middle class families, the cost of higher education. >> over the last three decades, the cost of higher education has gone up 260% at a time when family incomes have gone up about 16%. >> the president may have been slightly understating just how bad it is. while the cost of a private non-profit four-ye
years ago today, martin luther king junior delivered his legendary dream speech in washington. it was a battle cry for liberty and justice for all. it changed the course of our history. king would have been 84 years old had he lived to this day. he would have been able to witness the nation's first african-american president standing on those same steps he did in 1963. here is president obama commemorating dr. king's dream and his lasting legacy this afternoon. >> on a hot summer day they assembled here in our nation's capital under the shadow of the great emancipator. everyone that realizes what those glorious patriots knew on that day that change does not come from washington but to washington. that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship, you are marching. that's the lesson of our past. that's the promise of tomorrow. >> okay, bob, you were particularly moved by this speech as you were by dr. king's speech so many years, 50 years ago. >> yeah. i think if dr. king had been alive today, listened to these tributes,
, the american psyche. washington doesn't want to find the waste and fraud. one sixth of the economy is gone. government just took it. i don't think that the rest of the world is enamored of obama. if you read the foreign press you get the truth. i love radio. radio is the singest greatest opportunity i have to be who i am. >> rush limbaugh "on the record" you will hear rush say things you have never heard him say before. but first, in our one-on-one interview, rush limbaugh tells us what he thinks of president obama's phony scandal campaign. >> let me ask you. talking about the scandals, president obama says the scandals are phony. why do you think he says they're phony? because he believes it? or is there a strategy? >> no, there's a strategy. i've been troubled by something with the obama -- i playfully call it the regime as i know it irritates them. it is. it's like a regime. and i've been amazed. here is a man whose policies have done great damage to this country. policies of great damage to the economy, have done great damage to the american culture, to the american psyche. i mean, the
on an airline in honolulu and flew to washington, d.c., and lands at dulles and actually gets an audience, let's say, peter king, or dianne feinstein. how do we think he would have been received if he had a private audience? we have seen how they reacted, they spin the truth, he would have been buried and we would have never known the truth. >> i know you haven't been in direct contact with your son, but what do you know about his condition right now? >> i'll say that having spoken with his russian attorney, he said he's safe. he obviously is exhausted. but he's now needing a period of time where he can recoup his energy level and reflect on what he wishes to do going forward. that's from his attorney. we hope to meet with him very soon, with edward in the next weeks. >> good luck. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> and the chairs of the foreign affairs committee, robert menendez, democrat, and republican congressman ed royce, the chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. senator, let me begin with you, you heard this from lon snowden, and his attorney, they don't believe that ed
nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television show, this is "meet the press." >> good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous "i have a dream" speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secretary of the naacp, roy wilkins, appeared right here on "meet the press." many of you either already had the chance or will have the opportunity to see that special program as we have made it -- the original broadcast available to our nbc stations across the country. our roundtable joins us in just a moment. but first joining me now, the only living speaker from the march on washington, congressman john lewis. he spoke yesterday in front of the lincoln memorial. >> you cannot stand by. you cannot sit down. you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way, make some noise! >> congressman lewis, welcome back to "meet the press." >> thank you very much, david, for having me. >> what a moment. we actually have the two
in washington, d.c., where events are already underway for the 50th anniversary march on washington. thousands of people are gathered here already, with more continuing to stream in. among those scheduled to speak today are martin luther king iii, merly evers williams, the reverend al sharpton, attorney general eric holder, and john lewis. the only person to speak at the original march who is still alive today. here he is in 1963. >> by the forces of our demand, our determination, and our numbers, we shall splinter the segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. we must say, wake up, america! wake up! for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> on that day, 50 years ago, 250,000 people gathered here to demand the rights of full citizens. they demanded comprehensive civil rights legislation, school desegregation, full employment, living wages, and the aggressive use of federal authority to ensure economic political and social justice. 50 years later, we have made progress, was the struggle continues for those same demands. we
of "the washington post" mean for the entire news industry? "countdown to the closing bell" starts right now. ♪ double knockout ♪ ♪ liz: good afternoon, i am liz claman and it is the last hour of trading. a glitch in trading that we want to tell you about. global markets it is not yet known and last time we had a technical glitch on march 23, it has the part of the ipo. and cbs calling time warner cable a bluff on their offer of a sham. time warner cable has proposed is to return the cable. but only as an À la carte operation and offering. we are seeing hat done about two full percentage points newspaper ads making sure that people understand the position gold dropping $19.60 to 1000 to 82. it is just slightly above that right now. we are talking about this program. we just don't know where to go at this point. >> we are accounting for 86 points. ibm is pulling the dow jones down. part of it is the downgrade that you just mentioned. they are saying that the stock fell as low as $175. they are much closer of the 52 week low than the 52 week high. liz: how far is try carl icahn goi
a better time for this march on washington. heather headley has finished singing. here comes the president. [ cheers and applause ] >> to the king family, who have sacrificed and inspired so much, to president clinton, president carter, vice president biden, jill, fellow americans. five decades ago today americans came to this honored place to lay claim to a promise made at our founding. we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. in 1963, almost 200 years after those words were set to paper, a full century after a great war was fought and emancipation proclaimed, that promise, those truths remained unmet. and so they came by the thousands from every corner of our country, men and women, young and old, blacks who longed for freedom and whites who could no longer accept freedom for themselves while witnessing the subjugation of others. across the land congregations sent them off with food and with prayer. in the middle of the
this country and to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the good saturday afternoon to you, everyone. i am craig melvin coming live from the feet of the lincoln memorial continuing our coverage. we heard speech from civil rights and political leaders ranging from attorney general eric holder of course here and house speaker -- house minority leader nancy pelosi and the families of trayvon martin and of course martin luther king iii scheduled to join us at some point here over the next hour or so, and again right now thousands about to start retracing the steps that marchers took 50 years ago. so has peter alexander who is along the march route and let me start with you. what is the scene like right now? >> so right now we're along the route on independence avenue and you can see the police are clearing the way as they arrive here at the martin luther king memorial. we are joined by so many people who witnessed history as we wait to see those who participated in it, one of those voices is the gentleman i met today named franklin delano, no roosevelt, but williams. you
. a front-page cover on the washington post the release say it all. an icon gone scooped up by a billionaire businessman. still unknown. but does he know what he is getting nto? it turns out less to say that he has been there, done that and tell with a lot of grief. he is not going about journalists like me, but it is righnow, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quartemillion tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollarare changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. ♪ >> big news, the founder of amazon is buying the washington post. >> the family has run the washington post for four generations, but that is coming to an end. >> a stunning announcement. amazons ceo je bezos is buying the washington post. >> the news was so big, and it was announced on the sticker on the "washington post" building. >> a sign of our changing world, news tha
anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom. in 1963, more than 200,000 people of all ages, races, sexes, and sexual orientations gathered here peacefully, or, orderly, as the press reported it back then, right where i'm sitting today. i'm honored to be joined by this afternoon by some of the people who helped make that an historic day, as well as some of the people who continued dr. king's work, as we honor the past and we look forward. but first, a look at the present. one of those continuing dr. king's work is his son, dr. martin luther king iii, reflecting earlier on how much work we still have to do to achieve his father's vision from 50 years ago. let's take a listen. >> the vision preached by my father a half century ago was that his four little children would one day live in a nation where they would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. however, sadly, the tears of trayvon martin's mother and father remind us that far too frequently, the color of one's skin remains a license to profile, to arrest, and to even murder with n
. >>> meanwhile, a stunner the world of media, washington post selling the newspaper publishing businesses including amazon to jeff bezos, and julia boorstin has more on that blockbuster deal. >> this news took everyone including editors and writer at the post by surprise. the washington post's company whose name will change saw the stock rise with caplan tech being sold and now what the billionaire icon plans to do with the newspaper. jeff bezos stressed what a newspaper plays in a free society, and he says that the newspaper's duty remain s s to readers and not the owner. the charting of the map ahead is not going to be easy, and there is a need to invent, which means we will need to experiment. and after knowing each other for a decade, this came together in the conference last month. >> we met at a conference fa face-to-face twice. the second week in july. we spent an hour together, and he asked for time to study the numbers, and then we spent another two hour s together, an at the end he said he wanted to go ahead. >>> that is hardly the first billionaire to buy into publish i ing. th
structure remains shrouded in mystery. tom foreman, washington. >> of course the great irony using so much american innovation to try to destroy america. "outfront" next why dr. sanjay gupta change ed his mind on weed. an about-face and he h eel explain why. >>> then are you driving a compact car that failed a crash test? we have the alarming results. >>> and a double play. he made the catch but what he did next was the true score. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ >>> our fourth story "outfront," dr. sanjay gupta changes his mind on weed. washi
that changed america forever. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. people of all races, regular people from all walks of life marching against injustice, marching to change history. a day when the voices of the movement echoed across america. >> we are of a massive moral revolution. >> how long can we be patient? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to action and a call for peace. the words that inspired a people, a nation, and the entire world. >> free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last. >> tonight, a special two-hour edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington. the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. 50 years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am. right now watching history. millions more watching at home seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement, call for justice and equality. powerful speeches and powerful music from singers like lahalia jackson, bob dylan. tonight we'll hear those voices. we'll also hear from congressman john lewis. i talk t
>>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" live from washington, d.c. it's the last ed show on a saturday. let's get to work. >>> i have a dream today! >> the dream can only be realized if we pay attention to what's going on in our own backyard. >> you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way! make some noise! >> you cannot have economic and political equality without having some form of social equality. >> stand tall in your community, fight for diversity, understand its strength. >> and i don't think our society will rise to its full maturity until we come to see that men are made to live together as brothers. >> 50 years later, we need a team effort to make his dream come true. >> their march is now our march. >> so on the anniversary of the march on washington, our grandchildren will not be fighting the same fight. >> we must give our young people dreams again. >> i have a dream that we shall overcome. >> i stand here today in this sacred place, in my father's footsteps. >> my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will n
speaker from the march on washington, congressman john lewis. he spoke yesterday in front of the lincoln memorial. >> you cannot stand by. you cannot sit down. you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way, make some noise! >> congressman lewis, welcome back to "meet the press." >> thank you very much, david, for having me. >> what a moment. we actually have the two images. there you were 50 years ago as a 23-year-old speaking so powerfully and 50 years later an elder statesman, sir, if you don't mind ne saying. >> i don't mind. >> a pioneer of the civil rights struggle. that had to be quite a moment. >> it was a moving moment to stand there in the same spot 50 years later where dr. king and others stood. i think in the past 50 years we have witnessed what i'd like to call the nonviolent revolution in america, a revolution of values, a revolution of ideas, and our country is a better country. >> you know, the president will speak on wednesday in the same spot. he'll mark 50 years since the i have a dream speech. we've talked over the years, and you told me about a year
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
knowing exactly what he is up against, which was eloquently diagnosed 530 miles away from washington, d.c. in lexington, kentucky today by the 34-year-old democratic kentucky secretary of state, allison lundergin grimes, who is running to unseat republican mitch mcconnell in the senate. >> there is a disease in the dysfunction in washington, d.c. and after nearly 30 years, mitch mcconnell was at the center of it. where once, congressmen and senators would come together to work together for the common good. we now have senator mcconnell, the proud grid lock, grinding the government to a hold. senator mcconnell has blocked legislation that could actually help kentucky and move this nation forward. and for the past few years, he has done it for the worst possible reason, a reason that my grandmother would tell you was no motivation at all. out of spite. >> senator mcconnell offered this welcome to president obama on the senate floor in advance of his visit to the hill. >> it really would be nice to see president obama work with congress for a change. to get some important things done for t
homeland security committee. analysis from ted koppel of nbc news and "the washington post's" barton gellman. then presidential orders. strong words from the commander in chief this week about stamping out sexual assault in the military. the pentagon is preparing new rules, but there is an agreement on how to end the crisis. i go one-on-one with one of the lawmakers pushing for change, missouri senator claire mccaskill. >>> the immigration debate. a critical time for reform as members of congress head back to their districts to prepare for the fall fight. what are the prospects for passage? talk to both sides including the congressmen leading the fight against reform. >>> end of an era. the venerable "the washington post" is sold to amazon's jeff bez bezos. was what does it say about the future of traditional media? inside analyst from "the washington post's" david ignatius and david gross of "the new york times". all of that ahead on me"meet th press" this sunday morning, august 11th. good sunday morning. president obama is on vacation, congress is out of town, and although we are i
with a predictably defensive editorial by mayor michael bloomberg in the "washington post" in which the mayor took turns defending stop and fricsk and attacking the "washington post," itself, and others were criticizing the practice saying "the men and women who protect our city from criminals and terrorists deserve better than to have their integrity impugned in a courtroom or a newspaper especially when the facts are so clearly on their side." even today speaking at a press conference, touting the largest gun seizure in new york history, both men looked to play up the role of stop and frisk in getting guns off the street. >> wiretap conversations from this investigation show that one of the gun traffickers' biggest concerns was stop, question, frisk. >> campbell didn't want to risk it being found by new york police and is heard saying, "yeah. i'm in charlotte now. i can't take them to my house, to my side of town, in brownsville. we got, like, watchamacallit, stop and frisk. >> mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly doubling down and repeating the same statements again and again over stop and fr
, and his new documentary comes out september 27th. and "the washington post," ezra klein. robert reisch, we're at that time on the calendar again where september 30th we come to the point where we have to come up with a type of legislation to continue funding the government, followed quickly by an increase in the debt ceiling. and of course, as usual, the republican threats are flying. >> well, yes, lawrence, this whale of a fight. it is interesting to conceive of john boehner having a whale of a fight with a president that is not going to negotiate. it is like shadow boxing. and who are you actually going to fight with when the president is not going to negotiate? and the president is actually right in not negotiating. bond markets are already going to be roiled by the feds tapering off the quantitative easing, if you want a chance on that on the federal debt, we'll see the bond markets go crazy, wall street will go crazy, all the republican patriots will come down hard on them as they did the last time. >> i want to play what jay carney said about negotiating on the debt ceiling yesterday
, in connection with the speech he gave on the march on washington, i had provided him with a summary of ideas and summary of language that he had previously discussed. so it wasn't as if i was providing him with some creative ideas that were solely mine. i was more like a secretary who was summarizing and putting in the form that could be used for the speech, the opening paragraphs, little did i know, until i was sitting listening to him, i was standing some 50 feet behind him, when i was listening very carefully, i said, oh, my god, i guess he decided to use those opening paragraphs. to those paragraphs, which constituted the first seven paragraphs. to those opening paragraphs, he seemlessly added his own additional paragraphs, and it was when he was speaking his own additional paragraphs that he was interrupted from the written speech that he had prepared. and he was interrupted by mahalia jackson who shouted to him, tell him about the dream, martin. tell him about the dream. most people don't know that the speech which is so frequently celebrated over the years, the i have a dream speech,
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